Viewing entries tagged
Universal Basic Income

The Beauty of a Targeted Basic Income: Manageable Cost + Myriad Benefits

…my TBI would provide $1000/month up to six years total (minimum one month at a time) for adults enrolled at least part-time in postsecondary training and education programs, from ESL classes to apprenticeships to graduate school. Among the benefits…5. A TBI would not be means-tested so recipients could work without reducing the benefit. Note that part-time work (20 hours or less a week) is associated with higher college GPA and completion rates. …

How to Pay for a Targeted Basic Income - Responsibly!

Ok! The total TBI budget would be $567 billion, including 5% administration costs and based on an assumption that in any given year about 45 million Americans would avail themselves of the benefit. Here's where the money would come from…

A Targeted Basic Income Is Better Than A Universal Basic Income

It's important to remember that labor market participation isn't just the result of collective choices about whether to work or not to work but also about how much to work, e.g., part-time/full-time, seasonal/temp/year-round. These collective decisions also impact labor productivity and the vitality of the economy as a whole (not to mention the tax base). 

Revisiting The Universal Basic Income: The Debate Continues, Part XI

Some government programs have already been shown to reduce chronic and transient poverty. One multi-year study found that the following government benefits combined reduced the chronic US poverty rate from 10.8% to 2.1%...What more can be done? Lots! Just a few ideas...

Revisiting The Universal Basic Income: The Debate Continues, Part X

At the debate, UBI advocates dismissed these predictions as overly speculative,  maintaining that possible risks could be managed.  Their main argument was that a generous UBI was called for because Americans are suffering and their situation will keep getting worse without a major overhaul of the social contract.  More specifically:  poverty, income volatility, job instability and stalled social mobility are a plague upon the country and the only cure is a universal basic income. ...So let's look at these Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse:

Revisiting The Universal Basic Income: The Debate Continues, Part VII

In Europe, high unemployment has been associated with the following: “generous unemployment benefits that are allowed to run on indefinitely, combined with little or no pressure on the unemployed to obtain work and low levels of active intervention to increase the ability and willingness of the unemployed to work" …What is it about work, and looking for work, that so many people would prefer not to?

Revisiting The Universal Basic Income: The Debate Continues, Part VI

UBI advocates often argue that government benefits only disincentivize work when they’re means-tested or stopped if the recipient gets a job. They argue that if you eliminated this “work-penalty”, there’d be no work disincentive.  For proof, they point to Alaska...

Revisiting The Universal Basic Income: The Debate Continues, Part IV

A whopping 57% of households in the bottom income quintile  are single individuals. This is not so surprising, given that 44% of bottom quintile households are headed by individuals younger than 25 or older than 64.  We're talking young people and seniors.

Revisiting The Universal Basic Income: The Debate Continues, Part I

Motion Summary:  Basic income recipients would include children and adults; the employed and unemployed; and citizens, permanent residents, and all other residents who could prove a residency duration of at least three years. The amount given would start at $1,000 per person per month and be pegged to GDP growth going forward. No programs in the existing social safety would be replaced by this policy...This begins a series of posts laying out my case against the above UBI proposal.

Universal Basic Income: Effect on Labor Market Participation, Part II

As it is, we already have 23 million prime-age (24-54) adults who are not part of the US labor force. Many are unmarried, childless men with limited education and skills. Their numbers keep growing: the rate of inactive prime-age men has more than doubled since the 1970, when it was 4%  It is now 11%.

Universal Basic Income: Effect on Labor Market Participation, Part I

Here’s what they said they'd rather do with their time:

 

  • Spend quality time with loved ones (55 percent)
  • Pursue a creative passion, like art, music, video (39 percent)
  • Travel (38 percent)
  • Go to school (32 percent)
  • Volunteer (29 percent)
  • Take care of their heath (29 percent)
  • Take care of child (children) (29 percent)

Universal Basic Income: Effect on Full-Time Workers

So we have at least 6.1 million poorly paid full-time workers with limited earning potential. If they had a guaranteed UBI, I imagine some of these individuals would get off the treadmill and manage with the UBI, perhaps working part-time or taking on the  occasional full-time gig.